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Standard ST.10/C

Version 1.0

PRESENTATION OF BIBLIOGRAPHIC DATA COMPONENTS
Revision adopted by the SCIT Standards and Documentation Working Group at its fifth session on November 11, 2004

 

Editorial note
by the International Bureau published in December 2004

The Standard and Documentation Working Group (SDWG) of the Standing Committee on Information Technologies (SCIT) adopted the revisions of paragraphs 2 and 3 of Standard ST.10/C at its fifth session on November 11, 2004. These revisions incorporate changes made necessary by the IPC reform initiative.

Industrial property offices are asked to implement the new versions of paragraphs 2 and 3 of Standard ST.10/C for all patent documents with a publication date from January 1, 2006, onwards. For patent documents published prior to that date, the previous text of paragraphs 2 and 3 of the Standard should continue to be used.

The previous versions of paragraphs 2 and 3 of Standard ST.10/C, valid until December 31, 2005, are reproduced in the Annex to the new Standard ST.10/C.

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS


Presentation of dates

1.

For the representation of calendar dates according to the Gregorian calendar, which are printed or displayed in industrial property documents, in entries in official gazettes or in electronic records, WIPO Standard ST.2 is applicable.

Presentation of classification symbols

2.

The recommended abbreviation of the International Patent Classification is “Int.Cl.”.  The current version indicator of the core level (year) has to be placed in round brackets after the abbreviation “Int.Cl.”, if the document is classified, at least partly, using the core level. Most offices will classify a given document only in one level, i.e. only in the advanced level or only in the core level (see examples 3a and 3b).

The recommended presentation of classification symbols in printed or formatted display form is as follows:

  • classification symbols are presented in a tabular form, in such a manner as to facilitate machine transcription;
  • when classifying using the core level classification, IPC symbols are printed or displayed in regular font style, and when classifying using the advanced level classification, IPC symbols are printed or displayed in italics;
  • the invention information symbols are printed or displayed in bold font style and the non-invention information symbols in regular;
  • when classifying using the advanced level classification, the version indicator for each IPC symbol, indicating when this symbol was created or substantially revised at the advanced level (year, month), is placed in round brackets after each IPC symbol.

3.

Sample representations of IPC classification symbols and indicators are given below for the same document when classified using the advanced level, the core level or both the advanced level and the core level.

(a)  When classified in the advanced level:

Int. Cl.
B28B 5/00 (2006.01)
B28B 1/29
(2007.04)
H05B 3/18 (2008.07)

Where:

  • B28B 5/00  indicates invention information (bold font style) classified using the advanced level classification (italics font style);
  • B28B 1/29  indicates invention information (bold font style) classified using the advanced level classification (italics font style);
  • H05B 3/18  indicates non-invention information (regular font style, i.e., non-bold) classified using the advanced level classification (italics font style).

(b)  When classified in the core level:

Int. Cl. (2006)
B28B 5/00
B28B 1/00

H05B 3/10

Where:

  • B28B 5/00  indicates invention information (bold font style) classified using the core level classification (regular font style, i.e., non-italics);
  • B28B 1/00  indicates invention information (bold font style) classified using the core level classification (regular font style, i.e., non-italics);
  • H05B 3/10  indicates non-invention information (regular font style, i.e., non-bold) classified using the core level classification (regular font style, i.e., non-italics).

(c)  When invention information is classified in the advanced level and non-invention information in the core level:

Int. Cl. (2006)
B28B 5/00 (2006.01)
B28B 1/29 (2007.04)
H05B 3/10

Where:

  • B28B 5/00  indicates invention information (bold font style) classified using the advanced level classification (italics font style);
  • B28B 1/29  indicates invention information (bold font style) classified using the advanced level classification (italics font style);
  • H05B 3/10  indicates non-invention information (regular font style, i.e., non-bold) classified using the core level classification (regular font style, i.e., non-italics).

IPC symbols are defined in Part 5 of the WIPO Handbook on Industrial Property Information and Documentation and in the latest version of the Guide to the IPC.

This presentation is effective beginning with the January 1, 2006, edition of the IPC.*

4.

The recommended abbreviation of the International Classification for Industrial Designs is “LOC”.  According to the recommendation of the Committee of Experts of the Locarno Union, the edition of the Classification should be indicated by an Arabic numeral in parentheses, e.g., LOC (6) Cl. 8‑05.  Classification symbols should be presented with all elements of a given symbol contained in the same line, preferably in such a manner as to facilitate machine transcription.  If the numbers of several classes or subclasses must be indicated for one and the same subject matter, the classes should be separated by semicolons and subclasses by commas (for example, LOC (6) Cl. 8‑05, 08; 11‑01).

Presentation of application numbers

5.

Experience has shown the need for application numbers to be presented in a clear, unambiguous manner.  The considerations given below apply equally to all presentations of application numbers of patent documents whether to the application number accorded to the application filed in the issuing industrial property office or that filed in the priority country or with an organization.

6.

The presentation of the application number should preferably be:

(a)  exactly in the manner used by the country or organization concerned in full, or

(b)  abbreviated to the minimum significant part, enabling the application to be uniquely identified.

7.

When the application number is abbreviated to the minimum significant part (deletion of letters and numerals given by the country or organization concerned for internal or special purposes such as check digits, classification marks, etc.), a need exists for a more uniform presentation thereof, in particular when information presented on the first page of patent documents is composed for printing (e.g., typeset, photocomposed, retyped, etc.).  An application number, as represented by the country or organization concerned, may therefore be represented in a more uniform manner using the following rules:

(a)  if the number contains a full stop, a comma, or perhaps a space, one or more of these characters or spaces may be omitted.  One or more of these characters or spaces may be inserted for the sake of legibility;

(b)  if the number contains a slash or a hyphen, these characters must be retained. A hyphen may be replaced by a slash;

(c)  the sequence of characters should be left in its original order, e.g., the digits indicating the year of filing of the application must be printed in their original positions;

(d)  no character or set of characters forming the minimum significant part of the application number, other than those characters mentioned in subparagraphs (a) and (b), above, should be altered, e.g.:

(i)  the year of the Emperor’s reign appearing in Japanese application numbers should not be altered according to the Gregorian calendar;

(ii)  no infilling zeros should be removed or added, e.g., 74/0069 should not be printed as 74/69 or 74/00069;

(e)  in the case of a utility model application number, a letter or set of characters may be used by the country or organization concerned for uniquely defining the application.  The letter or set of characters should be removed and the letter “U” inserted after the application number, separated by two blank spaces.  The words “utility model” may be added in the plain language of the publishing country or organization;

(f)  year designations according to the Gregorian calendar should be represented by four digits;

(g)  in the case of PCT application numbers, the alphanumeric string consisting of the letters “PCT”, the two‑letter code identifying the receiving office, and the year, is a significant part of the application number and must not be omitted.

For guidance, two tables setting out the form of presentation of application numbers currently used by several countries or organizations, the minimum significant part of the numbers and the recommended presentation in abbreviated form as priority application numbers, are given in the document "Presentation of Application Numbers” (Part 7.2).

Identification of countries, organizations and other entities issuing or registering patent documents

8.

Two‑letter codes according to WIPO Standard ST.3 should be used when indicating:

(a)  the country, organization or other entity in which a convention priority application was filed;

(b)  the country, organization or other entity that published prior art patent documents; and

(c)  the country, organization or other entity publishing the patent document.  The name of the country, organization or other entity publishing the patent document may be given in plain language, in addition to the ST.3 code, if so desired.

Use and presentation of check digits

9.

Check digits are used by several industrial property offices in relation to application numbers or publication numbers for the purposes of internal control.  Different systems are in use by different industrial property offices.  Most systems give rise to a single control character, either a numeral from “0” to “9” or a letter from “A” to “Z”.  It is clear that the control character has to be associated with the application number or with the publication number so as to facilitate its control function.  However, the control character is not regarded as a significant part of the application number nor as a significant part of the publication number.

10.

In order to avoid confusion, it is recommended that the following rules be applied if industrial property offices wish to print a control character associated with an application number or with a publication number on patent documents or in official gazettes:

(a)  the control character should consist of a single numeral; letters should not be used so as to avoid confusion with WIPO Standard ST.16;

(b)  the control character should be printed immediately after the application number or publication number to which it refers but separated therefrom by a full stop or by a hyphen and preferably in a type font different from that used in the number to which it refers;

(c)  industrial property offices publishing control characters associated with application numbers or with publication numbers should publish in their official gazette information explaining their use, repeated at intervals of less than one year.

Presentation of priority application numbers

11.

Priority application numbers are provided to applicants by industrial property offices in the notifications of the first filing and in the certificates of priority under the Paris Convention.  Priority application numbers are then cited by applicants when filing a subsequent application for the same or related subject matter before a subsequent industrial property office in accordance with the Paris Convention.  The priority application number can then be used by industrial property offices to link all related patent document “families” together in databases and computerized search systems.  This ability to create patent families is tremendously valuable to industrial property offices for examination purposes, for example, when a better date of filing is needed during the prosecution of a later unrelated application.  Patent families also permit patent examiners to review previously published patent documents in a preferred language, if available.  Patent families can help offices save significant classification resources (financial, staffing, etc.) by allowing industrial property offices to use the classifications of one patent family member for all members of the patent family.

These and other uses of patent families make the accurate recording of the priority application number by applicants a critical concern of all industrial property offices.  Even small deviations from the correct priority application number format can cause patent documents to not be collected into a patent family.  Correction of errors in priority data cause huge expense for industrial property offices.  Therefore, it is critical that the provisions of this section of the standard be implemented by industrial property offices as soon as possible.

12.

(a)  In order to improve the quality of patent family data and to avoid confusion in the presentation of priority application numbers, the following recommendations are made:

Industrial property offices (IPOs) should always provide priority application number complying with “Recommended Presentation in Abbreviated Form as a Priority Application Number” given in the document “Presentation of Application Numbers” (Part 7.2) when presenting the application number of a patent document in the notification of the first filing and in the certificate of priority.  The “Recommended Presentation in Abbreviated Form as a Priority Application Number” should be presented with the Standard ST.3 code (preferably in a specified line or column along with the title “The country code (in case of the international organization, ‘The organization code’) and number of your priority application, to be used for filing abroad under the Paris Convention, is”) to be easily recognized as priority number by other IPOs and applicants.

Example of presentation of “Recommended Presentation in Abbreviated Form as a Priority Application Number”:

(i)  in case of the country:
The country code and number of your priority application, to be used for filing abroad under the Paris Convention, is JP2000‑001234

(ii)  in case of the international organization:
The organization code and number of your priority application, to be used for filing abroad under the Paris Convention, is EP79100953

(b)  Industrial property offices should encourage and facilitate the compliance by applicants of paragraph 12(a) of the Standard ST.10/C when providing the priority application number in subsequent filings.


* See “Editorial Note by the International Bureau” on the cover page.

 

ANNEX:  Previous version of Standard ST.10/C

PRESENTATION OF BIBLIOGRAPHIC DATA COMPONENTS

Revision adopted by the PCIPI Executive Coordination Committee at its twenty-first session on November 21, 1997

Presentation of dates

1.  For the representation of calendar dates according to the Gregorian calendar, which are printed or displayed in industrial property documents, in entries in official gazettes or in electronic records, WIPO Standard ST.2 is applicable.

Presentation of classification units

2.  Classification units should be presented with all elements of a given unit contained in the same line, preferably in such a manner as to facilitate machine transcription.

3.  The recommended abbreviation of the International Patent Classification is “Int.Cl.”.  The relevant edition should be indicated as a superscript, e.g., Int.Cl.6 in the case of the sixth edition.

4.  The recommended abbreviation of the International Classification for Industrial Designs is “LOC”.  According to the recommendation of the Committee of Experts of the Locarno Union, the edition of the Classification should be indicated by an Arabic numeral in parentheses, e.g., LOC (6) Cl. 8‑05. The subclass number must always contain two digits;  for the subclasses, therefore, the numbers 1 to 9 should be preceded by a 0;   the class number should be separated from the subclass number by a dash.  If the numbers of several classes or subclasses must be indicated for one and the same subject matter, the classes should be separated by semicolons and subclasses by commas (for example, LOC (6) Cl. 8‑05, 08; 11‑01).

Presentation of application numbers

5.  Experience has shown the need for application numbers to be presented in a clear, unambiguous manner, particularly since application numbers as presented on patent documents are frequently the sole method of identifying all members of a patent family.  The considerations given below apply equally to all presentations of application numbers of patent documents whether to the application number accorded to the application filed in the issuing industrial property office or that filed in the priority country or with an organization.

6. The presentation of the application number should preferably be:

(a) exactly in the manner used by the country or organization concerned in full, or

(b) abbreviated to the minimum significant part, enabling the application to be uniquely identified.

7.  When the application number is abbreviated to the minimum significant part (deletion of letters and numerals given by the country or organization concerned for internal or special purposes such as check digits, classification marks, etc.), a need exists for a more uniform presentation thereof, in particular when information presented on the first page of patent documents is composed for printing (e.g., typeset, photocomposed, retyped, etc.).  An application number, as represented by the country or organization concerned, may therefore be represented in a more uniform manner using the following rules:

(a) if the number contains a full stop, a comma, or perhaps a space, one or more of these characters or spaces may be omitted.  One or more of these characters or spaces may be inserted for the sake of legibility;

(b) if the number contains a slash or a hyphen, these characters must be retained.  A hyphen may be replaced by a slash;

(c) the sequence of characters should be left in its original order, e.g., the digits indicating the year of filing of the application must be printed in their original positions;

(d) no character or set of characters forming the minimum significant part of the application number, other than those characters mentioned in subparagraphs (a) and (b), above, should be altered, e.g.:

(i) the year of the Emperor’s reign appearing in Japanese application numbers should not be altered according to the Gregorian calendar;

(ii) no infilling zeros should be removed or added, e.g., 74/0069 should not be printed as 74/69 or 74/00069;

(e) in the case of a utility model application number, a letter or set of characters may be used by the country or organization concerned for uniquely defining the application.  The letter or set of characters should be removed and the letter “U” inserted after the application number, separated by two blank spaces.  The words “utility model” may be added in the plain language of the publishing country or organization;

(f) year designations according to the Gregorian calendar should be represented by four digits;

(g) in the case of PCT application numbers, the alphanumeric string consisting of the letters “PCT,” the two‑letter code identifying the receiving office, and the year, is a significant part of the application number and must not be omitted.

For guidance, two tables setting out the form of presentation of application numbers currently used by several countries or organizations, the minimum significant part of the numbers and the recommended presentation in abbreviated form as priority application numbers, are given in the document "Presentation of Application Numbers” Part 7.2).

Identification of countries, organizations and other entities issuing or registering patent documents

8.  Two‑letter codes according to WIPO Standard ST.3 should be used when indicating:

(a) the country, organization or other entity in which a convention priority application was filed;

(b) the country, organization or other entity that published prior art patent documents;  and

(c) the country, organization or other entity publishing the patent document. The name of the country, organization or other entity publishing the patent document may be given in plain language, in addition to the ST.3 code, if so desired.

Use and presentation of check digits

9.  Check digits are used by several industrial property offices in relation to application numbers or publication numbers for the purposes of internal control.  Different systems are in use by different industrial property offices.  Most systems give rise to a single control character, either a numeral from “0” to “9” or a letter from “A” to “Z”.  It is clear that the control character has to be associated with the application number or with the publication number so as to facilitate its control function.  However, the control character is not regarded as a significant part of the application number nor as a significant part of the publication number.

10.  In order to avoid confusion, it is recommended that the following rules be applied if industrial property offices wish to print a control character associated with an application number or with a publication number on patent documents or in official gazettes:

(a) the control character should consist of a single numeral;  letters should not be used so as to avoid confusion with WIPO Standard ST.16;

(b) the control character should be printed immediately after the application number or publication number to which it refers but separated therefrom by a full stop or by a hyphen and preferably in a type font different from that used in the number to which it refers;

(c) industrial property offices publishing control characters associated with application numbers or with publication numbers should publish in their official gazette information explaining their use, repeated at intervals of less than one year.

Further observations

11.  It is desirable that this Standard be implemented by industrial property offices at the latest as of January 1, 2000.

[End of Standard]

[WIPO Standard ST.10/D]